The Breakfast Club

"They only met once, but it changed their lives forever."

The Breakfast Club is about five high school students who are forced to spend an entire Saturday together in detention in the school's library. The students come from different social backgrounds and represent the various personalities one might find in a high school. Through humorous encounters and dramatic revelations, the teens come together to form a strong bond that unites them in their quest for adulthood.

Each student has his or her own issues that are revealed as the film progresses. Claire Standish is part of the social elite at the school, but has a host of problems with her family. She also strives to do something more with her life besides being popular. Andrew Clark is a sports star, but he is getting pressure from home to achieve at all costs. After some time, Bender tells the group of his problems at home and at school. Brian Johnson is the smart kid who gets straight A's but has trouble gaining any acceptance from his peers. Allison Reynolds is the school outcast, forced to exist in the margins. John Bender is considered the troublemaker of the group and is willing to instigate with anyone. Bender is also the catalyst for much of the action in the film, forcing the other students to open up and reveal their concerns about life.

The school's assistant principal, Dick Vernon, is overseeing the detention session and periodically checks in on the group while he works in his office. As the day progresses, Vernon grows more irritated with the students' behavior and occasionally lashes out at them, treating them more as equals rather than subordinates.

While the students are required to spend the entire day sitting in the library, they find different reasons to venture out into the school hallways, setting off a chain of events that force them to work together.

Ultimately, after a day full of excitement and tension, the five students come together in a circle to discuss their reasons for being in detention. Through this discussion, each reveals his or her vulnerabilities, which brings them closer together. They then celebrate this bond before leaving for the day.

The movie offers a rarely seen glimpse into the mind of teens and treats their thoughts and feelings with great respect. While teens may find the film especially poignant, the insecurities of the teen years is something that a person of any adult age can relate to.

R
| 1985 | 1 hr 37 min | 7.9/10
Cast
Studio
Director
John Hughes
Language
English
The Breakfast Club

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