Let It Be

Watch Let It Be

  • G
  • 1970
  • 1 hr 21 min
  • 7.7  (6,477)
  • 69

Let It Be is a documentary released in 1970 that showcases the making of The Beatles' twelfth studio album, also named Let It Be. The film was directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg and includes footage of the band in the studio, rehearsing and recording the album's tracks, as well as a live performance on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London.

The film begins with the group arriving at Twickenham Film Studios in January 1969 for rehearsals for a new album and a possible return to live performances. The studio footage shows the band members discussing and sometimes arguing about the creative direction of the album, as well as the technical aspects of recording. Notably, these discussions and debates often reflect the tension and disagreements between the band members, with George Harrison frequently clashing with Paul McCartney and John Lennon.

The film also features a number of musical performances, including the recording of Let It Be's titular track and other hits such as "Get Back," "I've Got a Feeling," and "Two of Us." The performances are raw and intimate, giving the viewer a glimpse into the band's creative process during this pivotal period of their career.

As the film progresses, tensions within the band continue to escalate, with George Harrison becoming increasingly frustrated with McCartney's control over the direction of the project. McCartney and Lennon, meanwhile, are often seen joking and playfully bantering with each other, but the underlying tension is never far from the surface.

Eventually, the group decides to abandon the Twickenham sessions and move to their own Apple Corps studios. Here, they continue to work on the album and eventually perform their final concert on the Apple Corps rooftop in central London. The rooftop concert is a highlight of the film, showcasing The Beatles' skills as live performers and drawing large crowds of onlookers onto the streets below.

Let It Be culminates in a poignant scene of the band members returning to the now-empty recording studio and reflecting on their time together. The film serves as a snapshot of a pivotal moment in the band's history, capturing the creative and personal tensions that would eventually lead to their breakup in 1970.

In addition to its insights into the making of The Beatles' final album, Let It Be is also noteworthy for its use of technology. The film was shot in a then-groundbreaking 16mm format and was one of the first major productions to use multitrack magnetic sound recording, allowing for a clearer, richer audio experience.

Overall, Let It Be is an engaging and insightful documentary that provides a unique perspective on one of the most influential bands in musical history. It offers an intimate look at the creative process of The Beatles and provides fascinating insights into the personal and artistic tensions that ultimately led to their dissolution. For anyone interested in the evolution of pop music or the cultural significance of The Beatles, Let It Be is an essential watch.

Let It Be
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Description
  • Release Date
    1970
  • MPAA Rating
    G
  • Runtime
    1 hr 21 min
  • Language
    English
  • IMDB Rating
    7.7  (6,477)
  • Metascore
    69