Sunday Too Far Away

Watch Sunday Too Far Away

"Friday night he's too tired; Saturday night too drunk; Sunday, too far away."
  • NR
  • 1974
  • 6.9  (909)

Sunday Too Far Away is a classic Australian film from the 1970s that has stood the test of time as a landmark of the country's cinema landscape. Starring Jack Thompson, Max Cullen, and Robert Bruning, the movie tells the story of a week in the life of a group of shearers on a remote sheep station in the Australian Outback. The film is set in the 1950s, during a time when shearing was one of the most important and lucrative industries in rural Australia. The shearing team consists of a motley crew of men from all walks of life, including the team leader Foley (Thompson), the hard-drinking and womanizing Old Garth (Cullen), and the young and inexperienced Arthur (Bruning), who is just learning the ropes of the trade. The movie centers on the struggles and challenges that these men face as they work tirelessly to shear the thousands of sheep on the station. Shearing is backbreaking, grueling work that requires incredible stamina and skill, and the film does an excellent job of depicting the physical and mental toll that it takes on the shearers. We see the men working tirelessly from dawn till dusk, covered in sweat and grime, as they shear sheep after sheep in a never-ending cycle. However, the movie isn't just about the work itself—it's also about the bonds that develop between these men over the course of the week. They all live together in the shearing sheds, sharing meals, drinks, and stories after a long day of work. As the week goes on, we see their relationships deepen and evolve, as they share their hopes, fears, and dreams with each other. One of the most impressive aspects of Sunday Too Far Away is its attention to detail in depicting life on a sheep station in the 1950s. The movie was filmed on location in the Outback, and the production team went to great lengths to ensure that everything from the shearing sheds to the corrugated iron roofs looked authentic. The result is a film that feels incredibly realistic and immersive, transporting the viewer to a time and place that few of us will ever experience firsthand. The acting in Sunday Too Far Away is universally excellent, with Jack Thompson in particular delivering a standout performance as Foley. Thompson has always been one of Australia's most accomplished actors, and his portrayal of the gruff, no-nonsense shearers' union rep is nothing short of outstanding. He perfectly captures the rough-and-tumble spirit of the time, and his scenes with Max Cullen's Old Garth are particularly memorable. The film also touches on some more serious themes, such as the exploitation of the shearers by the station owners and the tensions that exist between the shearers and the station's Aboriginal workforce. These themes are handled with sensitivity and nuance, and serve to deepen the film's impact and give it a greater sense of social relevance. In summary, Sunday Too Far Away is a classic Australian film that deserves to be seen by anyone interested in the country's rich cinematic heritage. With its authentic portrayal of life on a remote sheep station in the 1950s, its outstanding performances, and its nuanced exploration of social issues, it's a film that will stay with you long after the credits roll.

Sunday Too Far Away
Description
Sunday Too Far Away is a classic Australian film from the 1970s that has stood the test of time as a landmark of the country's cinema landscape. Starring Jack Thompson, Max Cullen, and Robert Bruning, the movie tells the story of a week in the life of a group of shearers on a remote sheep station in the Australian Outback. The film is set in the 1950s, during a time when shearing was one of the most important and lucrative industries in rural Australia. The shearing team consists of a motley crew of men from all walks of life, including the team leader Foley (Thompson), the hard-drinking and womanizing Old Garth (Cullen), and the young and inexperienced Arthur (Bruning), who is just learning the ropes of the trade.

The movie centers on the struggles and challenges that these men face as they work tirelessly to shear the thousands of sheep on the station. Shearing is backbreaking, grueling work that requires incredible stamina and skill, and the film does an excellent job of depicting the physical and mental toll that it takes on the shearers. We see the men working tirelessly from dawn till dusk, covered in sweat and grime, as they shear sheep after sheep in a never-ending cycle.

However, the movie isn't just about the work itself—it's also about the bonds that develop between these men over the course of the week. They all live together in the shearing sheds, sharing meals, drinks, and stories after a long day of work. As the week goes on, we see their relationships deepen and evolve, as they share their hopes, fears, and dreams with each other.

One of the most impressive aspects of Sunday Too Far Away is its attention to detail in depicting life on a sheep station in the 1950s. The movie was filmed on location in the Outback, and the production team went to great lengths to ensure that everything from the shearing sheds to the corrugated iron roofs looked authentic. The result is a film that feels incredibly realistic and immersive, transporting the viewer to a time and place that few of us will ever experience firsthand.

The acting in Sunday Too Far Away is universally excellent, with Jack Thompson in particular delivering a standout performance as Foley. Thompson has always been one of Australia's most accomplished actors, and his portrayal of the gruff, no-nonsense shearers' union rep is nothing short of outstanding. He perfectly captures the rough-and-tumble spirit of the time, and his scenes with Max Cullen's Old Garth are particularly memorable.

The film also touches on some more serious themes, such as the exploitation of the shearers by the station owners and the tensions that exist between the shearers and the station's Aboriginal workforce. These themes are handled with sensitivity and nuance, and serve to deepen the film's impact and give it a greater sense of social relevance.

In summary, Sunday Too Far Away is a classic Australian film that deserves to be seen by anyone interested in the country's rich cinematic heritage. With its authentic portrayal of life on a remote sheep station in the 1950s, its outstanding performances, and its nuanced exploration of social issues, it's a film that will stay with you long after the credits roll.

Sunday Too Far Away is a 1974 drama. It has received mostly positive reviews from critics and viewers, who have given it an IMDb score of 6.9.

Where to Watch Sunday Too Far Away

Sunday Too Far Away is available to watch free on Tubi TV. It's also available to stream, download and buy on demand at The Roku Channel and Amazon. Some platforms allow you to rent Sunday Too Far Away for a limited time or purchase the movie and download it to your device.

  • Release Date
    1974
  • MPAA Rating
    NR
  • Language
    English
  • IMDB Rating
    6.9  (909)