A Place at the Table

Watch A Place at the Table

  • PG
  • 2013
  • 1 hr 24 min
  • 6.9  (1,222)
  • 68

A Place at the Table is a 2012 documentary film that sheds light on the issue of food insecurity and hunger in America. Directed by Kristi Jacobson and Lori Silverbush, the film features the perspectives of activists, experts, and people who are struggling to put food on the table. The movie starts with a somber note through an anecdote shared by a young girl from Colorado. Rosie, the girl, revealed that she was often hungry because her family couldn't afford enough food. Rosie's story is not unique, and the film highlights how 50 million Americans, including 1 in 4 children, don't know where their next meal is coming from.

The film goes on to explore the root causes of food insecurity in America, which is not primarily because of the lack of food but rather due to the inability of people to access nutritious food. The film argues that despite America producing more food than it consumes, food insecurity remains a pervasive issue due to poverty and the flawed food system.

Jeff Bridges, an Academy Award-winning actor, narrates the film and shares his experience with hunger while growing up. Bridges also shares his commitment to ending hunger and advocates for policy changes to address the issue.

The film also features Tom Colicchio, the celebrity chef and judge of Top Chef, who speaks about the importance of access to healthy food. Colicchio emphasizes that those who are food insecure are not only at risk of malnourishment but also health complications like obesity, which is common among people who rely on highly processed and inexpensive food.

Ken Cook, founder of Environmental Working Group, is another voice in the film that challenges the conventional food system. Cook argues that agribusiness and food corporations prioritize profit over health and sustainability, and this has led to a concentration of power in the food industry.

The film interweaves personal stories of hunger and food insecurity, and the struggle of activists working to change the status quo. There is a focus on the toxic effects of food insecurity, including hunger pangs, fatigue, and anxiety, which reinforces the need to address hunger.

However, the film is not all gloom and doom as it also spotlights initiatives that are making a difference. A Place at the Table features examples of organizations that are working to provide access to healthy food in underserved areas. One such initiative is Philadelphia's Fresh Food Financing Initiative, which has successfully provided funding and support to open grocery stores in low-income communities.

Throughout the documentary, the filmmakers encourage people to take action to end food insecurity. They urge people to call on their lawmakers to support initiatives that help eliminate hunger, and to get involved with organizations that are working to end food insecurity.

In conclusion, A Place at the Table is a powerful and thought-provoking documentary that exposes the realities of hunger and food insecurity in America. It highlights the urgent need for policy changes that address the root causes of hunger and asks viewers to take action to fight for food justice. The film is a must-watch for anyone who cares about social justice and ending poverty.

A Place at the Table is a 2013 documentary with a runtime of 1 hour and 24 minutes. It has received mostly positive reviews from critics and viewers, who have given it an IMDb score of 6.9 and a MetaScore of 68.

A Place at the Table
Description
Where to Watch A Place at the Table
A Place at the Table is available to watch free on Plex, Pluto TV and Kanopy. It's also available to stream, download and buy on demand at Amazon Prime, Apple TV, Amazon, Google Play, YouTube VOD and Vudu. Some platforms allow you to rent A Place at the Table for a limited time or purchase the movie and download it to your device.
  • Release Date
    2013
  • MPAA Rating
    PG
  • Runtime
    1 hr 24 min
  • Language
    English
  • IMDB Rating
    6.9  (1,222)
  • Metascore
    68