Jumpin at the Boneyard

Watch Jumpin at the Boneyard

"Brothers don't always love each other but sometimes they have to"
  • R
  • 1992
  • 1 hr 47 min
  • 6.0  (549)

Jumpin at the Boneyard is a 1991 independent drama film that showcases the deep emotional turmoil of a family in the absence of their father. The movie stars the legendary Tim Roth, the late Alexis Arquette, and Danitra Vance in key roles. The film explores several mature themes in a raw, visceral manner and features performances that pack a punch.

The film takes place in the 90s in New York City, and the story revolves around a dysfunctional family of three siblings. The eldest, Benny (Roth), is a young man struggling with a drug addiction. He's trying hard to turn his life around and get back on track, but he's finding it difficult to stay clean. He's an ex-drug dealer who's trying to make amends for his past mistakes while making ends meet by working as a welder.

His younger brother, Reuben (Arquette), is mentally ill and suffering from schizophrenia. He's spent most of his life in a mental institution, and when he's released, his family struggles to cope with his uncontrolled outbursts and erratic behavior. Reuben is a troubled soul who's trying to make sense of the world around him and his place in it.

Their sister, Donna (Vance), is a nurse who's been the rock of the family, holding everything together in the absence of their father. She's the only one who seems to have her life together, but deep down, she's struggling with her own personal demons.

As the movie progresses, we get a glimpse into the family's past and the issues they've had to deal with. The film is a no-holds-barred look at the harsh realities of addiction, mental illness, and the toll it takes on the people it affects. It's raw, intense, and often heart-wrenching in its portrayal of these struggles.

Jumpin at the Boneyard deals with some controversial themes, especially with regards to Reuben's mental illness. However, the movie handles it with sensitivity and compassion, providing a nuanced look at the struggles of someone with schizophrenia. The film also doesn't shy away from the harsh realities of addiction and the risks that come with being a drug dealer.

The performances from the three leads are excellent, with each actor bringing their unique style to their respective roles. Tim Roth gives an outstanding performance as Benny, portraying the character's vulnerability and inner turmoil with ease. Alexis Arquette, in one of his most notable roles, gives a remarkable performance as Reuben, showcasing the character's complexity and emotional depth. Danitra Vance rounds out the trio with her strong portrayal of Donna, depicting the character's strength and vulnerability.

Jumpin at the Boneyard is a hard-hitting film that deals with some difficult issues, but it does so with sensitivity and understanding. The movie is a poignant tale of a family dealing with addiction and mental illness, showcasing the strength it takes to overcome these challenges. The film doesn't provide a neat and tidy resolution, but it does offer hope and a sense of healing.

Overall, Jumpin at the Boneyard is an intense film that's not for the faint of heart. It's a powerful, thought-provoking, and emotionally charged film that makes an impact long after it's over. The movie is a reminder that no matter how challenging life gets, there's always hope for a better tomorrow.

Jumpin at the Boneyard is a 1992 drama with a runtime of 1 hour and 47 minutes. It has received moderate reviews from critics and viewers, who have given it an IMDb score of 6.0.

Jumpin at the Boneyard
Description
Where to Watch Jumpin at the Boneyard
Jumpin at the Boneyard is available to watch, stream, download and buy on demand at Apple TV, Amazon, Google Play, YouTube VOD and Vudu. Some platforms allow you to rent Jumpin at the Boneyard for a limited time or purchase the movie and download it to your device.
  • Release Date
    1992
  • MPAA Rating
    R
  • Runtime
    1 hr 47 min
  • Language
    English
  • IMDB Rating
    6.0  (549)