The Seven Five

Watch The Seven Five

"In 1980's Brooklyn, The Most Dangerous Gangsters Were New York City Cops."
  • R
  • 2015
  • 1 hr 42 min
  • 7.6  (6,133)
  • 69

The Seven Five is a gripping documentary film that takes viewers back to the corrupt and violent era of New York City in the 1980s. Released in 2014, the movie tells the real-life story of Michael Dowd, a former police officer who was at the center of one of the biggest police corruption scandals in the city's history. The film reconstructs Dowd's life as a cop-turned-criminal and his partnership with Ken Eurell, another police officer who got involved in the same web of corruption.

Directed by Tiller Russell, The Seven Five is a masterful combination of interviews, old footage, and dramatic reenactments that bring Dowd's story to life. The movie traces Dowd's trajectory as a rookie cop in Brooklyn's 75th precinct, where he quickly learned the ropes of the game and became a trusted member of his colleagues. However, as his ambitions grew, Dowd became involved in drug trafficking, bribery, and other illegal activities that ultimately led to his downfall.

One of the most impressive aspects of The Seven Five is how it blends different perspectives on the story. The movie features interviews with Dowd himself, as well as with Eurell, who provides a contrasting view on their friendship and partnership. In addition, the film also includes interviews with other police officers from the same period, who shed light on the culture of corruption and violence that prevailed at the time. By putting these different voices in conversation, The Seven Five offers a nuanced and multifaceted picture of the events.

Another strength of the movie is how it captures the gritty and violent atmosphere of 1980s New York. Through a mix of archival footage and new shots, the film portrays the dangerous streets and the chaotic police stations where Dowd and his colleagues operated. The use of music from the era, such as Public Enemy's "Fight the Power," also adds to the film's immersive quality and makes viewers feel as if they are reliving that era.

However, what makes The Seven Five truly compelling is the character of Michael Dowd himself. Despite his wrongdoings, Dowd comes across as a charismatic and complex figure, whose motivations and justifications are both fascinating and troubling. Dowd's interviews are candid and unsettling, as he admits to his crimes and reflects on his life. The film manages to present Dowd as both a product of his environment and a responsible individual who made choices that had consequences. This dual perspective makes The Seven Five a thought-provoking exploration of the nature of corruption and power.

Alongside Dowd, the movie also features other key players in the story, such as Eurell and Walter Yurkiw, a DEA agent who was instrumental in bringing Dowd down. Yurkiw's testimony and insights provide a crucial counterpoint to Dowd's narrative, and add a sense of justice to the story.

Overall, The Seven Five is a gripping and thought-provoking documentary that sheds light on a dark period of New York City's history. The movie's mix of interviews, footage, and reenactments, as well as its nuanced portrayal of its characters, make it an engrossing and sobering portrait of the corrosive effects of power and corruption.

The Seven Five is a 2015 documentary with a runtime of 1 hour and 42 minutes. It has received mostly positive reviews from critics and viewers, who have given it an IMDb score of 7.6 and a MetaScore of 69.

The Seven Five
Description
Where to Watch The Seven Five
The Seven Five is available to watch free on Tubi TV and Kanopy. It's also available to stream, download and buy on demand at Amazon Prime, The Roku Channel, Apple TV, Amazon, Google Play and YouTube VOD. Some platforms allow you to rent The Seven Five for a limited time or purchase the movie and download it to your device.
  • Release Date
    2015
  • MPAA Rating
    R
  • Runtime
    1 hr 42 min
  • Language
    English
  • IMDB Rating
    7.6  (6,133)
  • Metascore
    69