Dogtown and Z-Boys

Watch Dogtown and Z-Boys

"The birth of extreme"
  • PG-13
  • 2001
  • 1 hr 31 min
  • 7.6  (13,162)
  • 76

Dogtown and Z-Boys is a 2001 documentary film directed by Stacy Peralta. The movie revolves around the skateboarding culture in the 1970s in Southern California, particularly the group of young skateboarders known as the Z-Boys who were part of the Dogtown neighborhood of Venice, California. Narrated by Sean Penn, the documentary takes the audience back to the early 1970s, where the skateboard was considered a toy for children. The film explores how the Z-Boys started from humble beginnings and transformed the sport of skateboarding into a global phenomenon. The movie features interviews with the original members of the Z-Boys, including Tony Alva, Jay Adams, and Stacy Peralta. The film highlights the evolution of skateboarding from a hobby to a professional sport. The Z-Boys were responsible for introducing a radical style of skateboarding that involved skating in empty pools, drainage ditches, and vertical walls. The movie portrays how the Z-Boys' skateboarding style was influenced by surfing, and how they incorporated surfing moves into their skateboard routines. The documentary shows how the Z-Boys and their unique style of skateboarding became an integral part of the Southern Californian culture. Their style became so popular that they were soon approached by brands like OJ Wheels, Z-Flex, and Powell-Peralta, among others, to showcase their products. Dogtown and Z-Boys explores the personal lives of the Z-Boys, including their struggles with addiction and brushes with the law. The documentary also sheds light on the rise of punk rock music and how it influenced the Z-Boys' style, both on and off the skateboard. The film is well-crafted, featuring a blend of vintage footage, interviews, and re-enactments that give an accurate and colorful portrayal of Southern California culture in the 1970s. The movie is complemented by a brilliant soundtrack that showcases the punk rock scene in Southern California. In conclusion, Dogtown and Z-Boys is a must-watch for anyone interested in skateboarding, surfing, punk rock, or Southern California culture in general. The documentary provides a fascinating insight into the lives of a group of young skateboarders who transformed the sport forever.

Dogtown and Z-Boys
Description
Dogtown and Z-Boys is a 2001 documentary film directed by Stacy Peralta. The movie revolves around the skateboarding culture in the 1970s in Southern California, particularly the group of young skateboarders known as the Z-Boys who were part of the Dogtown neighborhood of Venice, California. Narrated by Sean Penn, the documentary takes the audience back to the early 1970s, where the skateboard was considered a toy for children. The film explores how the Z-Boys started from humble beginnings and transformed the sport of skateboarding into a global phenomenon. The movie features interviews with the original members of the Z-Boys, including Tony Alva, Jay Adams, and Stacy Peralta.

The film highlights the evolution of skateboarding from a hobby to a professional sport. The Z-Boys were responsible for introducing a radical style of skateboarding that involved skating in empty pools, drainage ditches, and vertical walls. The movie portrays how the Z-Boys' skateboarding style was influenced by surfing, and how they incorporated surfing moves into their skateboard routines.

The documentary shows how the Z-Boys and their unique style of skateboarding became an integral part of the Southern Californian culture. Their style became so popular that they were soon approached by brands like OJ Wheels, Z-Flex, and Powell-Peralta, among others, to showcase their products.

Dogtown and Z-Boys explores the personal lives of the Z-Boys, including their struggles with addiction and brushes with the law. The documentary also sheds light on the rise of punk rock music and how it influenced the Z-Boys' style, both on and off the skateboard.

The film is well-crafted, featuring a blend of vintage footage, interviews, and re-enactments that give an accurate and colorful portrayal of Southern California culture in the 1970s. The movie is complemented by a brilliant soundtrack that showcases the punk rock scene in Southern California.

In conclusion, Dogtown and Z-Boys is a must-watch for anyone interested in skateboarding, surfing, punk rock, or Southern California culture in general. The documentary provides a fascinating insight into the lives of a group of young skateboarders who transformed the sport forever.

Dogtown and Z-Boys is a 2001 documentary with a runtime of 1 hour and 31 minutes. It has received mostly positive reviews from critics and viewers, who have given it an IMDb score of 7.6 and a MetaScore of 76.

Where to Watch Dogtown and Z-Boys

Dogtown and Z-Boys is available to watch free on The Roku Channel Free and Tubi TV. It's also available to stream, download and buy on demand at Apple TV, Amazon, Google Play, YouTube VOD and Vudu. Some platforms allow you to rent Dogtown and Z-Boys for a limited time or purchase the movie and download it to your device.

  • Release Date
    2001
  • MPAA Rating
    PG-13
  • Runtime
    1 hr 31 min
  • Language
    English
  • IMDB Rating
    7.6  (13,162)
  • Metascore
    76