The Victory Garden

Watch The Victory Garden

  • 2009
  • 1 Season
  • 7.3  (23)

The Victory Garden, initially known as Crockett's Victory Garden, is a PBS television program about gardening flowers, fruits, and vegetables and it is also the oldest gardening television program on television. Spurred on by the harsh economic situation of the '70s as well as the Arab oil crisis of 1975, show creator Russell Morash established the program in the hope that people would be inspired to establish their own titular victory gardens much like landowners during both World Wars would cultivate. Given its nearly 40 year run, The Victory Garden has had a modest number of hosts. The show's initial title was derived from James Underwood Crockett; while a man with no experience in front of a camera, he remained the show's host due to his impressive amount of knowledge on all things gardening until Bob Thomson replaced him in the '79-'80 season. Thomson initially served as a substitute host for Crockett, eventually becoming full-time host with Crockett's death. Thomson's prowess in running a nursery, a garden, and working in radio for decades gave credit to his run of the show, which was broadened to include travel segments and guest appearances. Eventually, Bob Thomson retired in the mid '80s and passed the torch to Roger Swain, a biologist, gardener and author whose life outside the role as show host was dedicated to tending to his garden and orchard. Swain retired as host of The Victory Garden in 2002, handing hosting duties over to Michael Weishan for five show seasons. Weishan's run of the program added several small segments such as Paul Epsom's role as garden correspondent, Kip Anderson who had tended to gardens featured on the show for more than two decades, and lastly, Sissy Biggers' segment as a garden lifestyle reporter. The final, current, host of The Victory Garden is Australian personality Jamie Durie whose run as show host has focused on a message of environmental awareness.

The Victory Garden
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Seasons
Cool: Create a Garden That's Cool
5. Cool: Create a Garden That's Cool
December 28, 2009
Explore a private garden in Beverly Hills with host Jamie Durie and see some fantastic pool-side landscaping; grow a garden that incorporates cook colors into perennial borders; pick the best plants for winter interest with gardening correspondent Paul Epson's favorites; and refresh your day with an appetizing recipe for a cool soup demonstrated by chef Michel Nischan.
Vertical: Think Up!
4. Vertical: Think Up!
December 29, 2009
Find the best climbing plants with garden correspondent Paul Epsom; create a vertical element in your garden with a bougainvillea espalier, inspired by The Getty Museum's Art collection; and stir up some tasty concoctions when Michel Nischan shows you how fresh juice can brighten any recipe.
Hot: Create a Garden that Beats the Heat
3. Hot: Create a Garden that Beats the Heat
December 28, 2009
Explore an incredible collection of cycads in Los Angeles with host Jamie Durie; watch the Stone Guys heat up the garden with a firepit and outdoor wood-burning oven; cultivate a vibrant garden with correspondent Paul Epsom's tips on hot color combos for the garden; and discover the many varieties of eggplant with chef Michel Nischan.
Wet: Learn About Water in Your Garden
2. Wet: Learn About Water in Your Garden
December 29, 2009
Explore the Water Conservation Garden and learn about xeriscaping -- water-wise gardening; join gardening correspondent Paul Epsom at Longwood Gardens to learn about water features and elements that can add to any garden; and grow your own tea garden with Kip Anderson.
Dry: Use Less Water in Your Landscape
1. Dry: Use Less Water in Your Landscape
September 5, 2009
Plant your own water-wise garden with tips from host Jamie Durie; learn to create a dry-laid garden wall; grow a fire-wise garden; and eat healthy with chef Michel Nischan who demonstrates how to make a Native-American style "Three Sisters" salad.
Description

The Victory Garden, initially known as Crockett's Victory Garden, is a PBS television program about gardening flowers, fruits, and vegetables and it is also the oldest gardening television program on television. Spurred on by the harsh economic situation of the '70s as well as the Arab oil crisis of 1975, show creator Russell Morash established the program in the hope that people would be inspired to establish their own titular victory gardens much like landowners during both World Wars would cultivate.

Given its nearly 40 year run, The Victory Garden has had a modest number of hosts. The show's initial title was derived from James Underwood Crockett; while a man with no experience in front of a camera, he remained the show's host due to his impressive amount of knowledge on all things gardening until Bob Thomson replaced him in the '79-'80 season. Thomson initially served as a substitute host for Crockett, eventually becoming full-time host with Crockett's death. Thomson's prowess in running a nursery, a garden, and working in radio for decades gave credit to his run of the show, which was broadened to include travel segments and guest appearances. Eventually, Bob Thomson retired in the mid '80s and passed the torch to Roger Swain, a biologist, gardener and author whose life outside the role as show host was dedicated to tending to his garden and orchard. Swain retired as host of The Victory Garden in 2002, handing hosting duties over to Michael Weishan for five show seasons. Weishan's run of the program added several small segments such as Paul Epsom's role as garden correspondent, Kip Anderson who had tended to gardens featured on the show for more than two decades, and lastly, Sissy Biggers' segment as a garden lifestyle reporter. The final, current, host of The Victory Garden is Australian personality Jamie Durie whose run as show host has focused on a message of environmental awareness.

  • Premiere Date
    September 5, 2009
  • IMDB Rating
    7.3  (23)