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For the science lover in all of us, NOVA has been providing some of the very best content for years now, and it's not available on cable programming. This PBS show shows you don't need to go out and spend money on cable and satellite just to receive interesting and in depth material. With the programming you receive on NOVA, you don't need to worry about ordering higher tier stations, as you'll receive more in-depth reporting and information right on this program. Of course, with the wide spectrum of material and content NOVA looks over, you never know what you're going to receive, night in and night out.

Every different show on NOVA is going to be a bit different from the episode prior. This is because NOVA doesn't focus on one specific set of information, but instead on different material. This ranges from Mars and the universe to animals and even history. This helps enlighten viewers on just about any subject imaginable. So, if you're watching a show during any given week and don't like the subject matter, you don't have to worry, because there is something new for you the next week which you might enjoy.

One aspect of NOVA that sets it apart from the other science based programming is the overall beauty of the content. From high-definition video content is breathtaking, as everything from animal close-ups to brilliantly rendered graphics help put you right in the middle of the action, whether it be a Viking crafting a sword or the Mars Lander scouring the alien atmosphere. Whatever the content is and whatever the camera or computer is focusing on, you can rest assured it is going to be the very best quality. The producers of NOVA obviously care a great deal about the material the show produces and doesn't want to spare any expense at pushing the subject matter across to the viewers.

For a truly remarkable treat, NOVA provides some of the very best content and programming out there, and best of all, you don't need to pay a dime for it. NOVA is fascinating, from its look in on wildlife to the very start of the universe, if you have an interest in any sort of science, there is something for you right here. Just make sure to check out the show by contacting your local PBS station and inquire as to when it airs.

NOVA is a series that is currently running and has 50 seasons (889 episodes). The series first aired on March 3, 1974.

Where do I stream NOVA online? NOVA is available for streaming on PBS, both individual episodes and full seasons. You can also watch NOVA on demand at Amazon Prime, Amazon, Vudu, Microsoft Movies & TV, Google Play, iTunes, PBS online.

Tuesday 8:00 PM et/pt on PBS
50 Seasons, 889 Episodes
March 3, 1974
8.7/10
Cast: Lance Lewman
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NOVA Full Episode Guide

  • Featured are the value of DNA testing and the risks of entrusting this private data to commercial enterprises and online databases.

  • As global temperatures continue to rise, scientists are wondering if we need solutions beyond reducing emissions. Enter geoengineering. From sucking carbon straight out of the air to physically blocking out sunlight, the options may seem far-fetched. But as time runs out on conventional solutions to climate change, scientists are asking the hard questions: Can geoengineering really work? How much would it cost? And what are the risks of engineering Earth's climate?

  • In October 2020, a NASA spacecraft called OSIRIS-REx attempts to reach out and grab a piece of an asteroid named Bennu to bring it back to Earth. The OSIRIS-REx team has just three chances to extend its spacecraft's specialized arm, touch down for five seconds, and collect material from the surface of Bennu. But if they can pull it off, scientists could gain great insight into Earth's own origins

  • For animals in Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, the normal balance of competition and predation was upended when a war wiped out the top predators. The remaining animals didn't simply grow in numbers

  • Just as writing changed the course of human history, the evolution of paper and printing revolutionized the spread of information. The printing press kicked off the Industrial Revolution that fast-tracked us to the current digital age. But as the 4,000-year-old tradition of penmanship falls out of favor, should we consider what might be lost in this pursuit of ever more efficient communication?

  • Where would we be without the world's alphabets? Writing has played a vital role in the expansion and domination of cultures throughout history. But researchers are only now uncovering the origin story to our own alphabet, which may have gotten its beginnings in a turquoise mine 4,000 years ago. From the shape of the letter A to the role of writing in trade and storytelling, discover how the written word shaped civilization itself.

  • Who says you need brains to be smart? Extremely primitive life-forms called slime molds can navigate mazes, choose between foods, and create efficient networks

  • Our DNA can determine attributes from eye color to medical predispositions. An extraordinary technology called CRISPR allows us to edit human DNA, possibly eliminating genetic diseases or choosing our children's features. But how far should we go?

  • Eagles dominate the skies. But what makes these predators so special? Researchers study one special bird

  • Do we control our fat, or does it control us? For generations, overweight individuals have been stigmatized and cast as lazy. But scientists are coming to understand fat as a fascinating and dynamic organ

  • From fruit flies to whales, virtually every animal sleeps. But why? Why do we need to spend nearly a third of our lives in such a defenseless state? Scientists are peering more deeply into the sleeping brain than ever before, discovering just how powerful sleep can be, playing a role in everything from memory retention and emotional regulation to removing waste from our brains. So why are we getting so little of it?

  • Worshipped as a goddess, condemned as satanic, and spun into a stunning array of breeds, cats have long fascinated humans. But did we ever really domesticate them? And what can science tell us about our most mysterious companions?

  • Dogs have long been dependable companions by our sides. But it wasn't always that way, and a look at their closest living relative, the wolf, makes it clear why. Research into dog domestication and intelligence offers clues into what the human-dog relationship is all about. And analyzing dogs' brain activity and genes may even help answer the question of whether dogs are in it for the food

  • In this two-hour special, renowned paleontologist Kirk Johnson takes us on an epic adventure through time at the polar extremes of our planet. Following a trail of strange fossils found in all the wrong places

NOVA News

NOVA Video Clips & Extras

A To Z: The First Alphabet Clip (00:31) Secret Mind Of Slime Clip (00:30) Mysteries Of Sleep Clip (00:31) How Climate Has Shifted Over Millions of Years I NOVA I PBS Clip (02:45) This Cave Has Been Frozen Since the Last Ice Age I NOVA I PBS Clip (06:41) Fifty Million Years Ago, the Arctic Was a Warm Swamp I NOVA I PBS Clip (02:08) Meet "Titanosaur," the Largest Dinosaur Ever 360 I NOVA I PBS Clip (02:07) Why Trees Are Living Climate Records I NOVA I PBS Clip (01:29)