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For the science lover in all of us, NOVA has been providing some of the very best content for years now, and it's not available on cable programming. This PBS show shows you don't need to go out and spend money on cable and satellite just to receive interesting and in depth material. With the programming you receive on NOVA, you don't need to worry about ordering higher tier stations, as you'll receive more in-depth reporting and information right on this program. Of course, with the wide spectrum of material and content NOVA looks over, you never know what you're going to receive, night in and night out.

Every different show on NOVA is going to be a bit different from the episode prior. This is because NOVA doesn't focus on one specific set of information, but instead on different material. This ranges from Mars and the universe to animals and even history. This helps enlighten viewers on just about any subject imaginable. So, if you're watching a show during any given week and don't like the subject matter, you don't have to worry, because there is something new for you the next week which you might enjoy.

One aspect of NOVA that sets it apart from the other science based programming is the overall beauty of the content. From high-definition video content is breathtaking, as everything from animal close-ups to brilliantly rendered graphics help put you right in the middle of the action, whether it be a Viking crafting a sword or the Mars Lander scouring the alien atmosphere. Whatever the content is and whatever the camera or computer is focusing on, you can rest assured it is going to be the very best quality. The producers of NOVA obviously care a great deal about the material the show produces and doesn't want to spare any expense at pushing the subject matter across to the viewers.

For a truly remarkable treat, NOVA provides some of the very best content and programming out there, and best of all, you don't need to pay a dime for it. NOVA is fascinating, from its look in on wildlife to the very start of the universe, if you have an interest in any sort of science, there is something for you right here. Just make sure to check out the show by contacting your local PBS station and inquire as to when it airs.

NOVA is a series that is currently running and has 49 seasons (882 episodes). The series first aired on March 3, 1974. It has mostly positive reviews from critics and viewers, who have given it an IMDb score of 8.7.

NOVA is available for streaming on the PBS website, both individual episodes and full seasons. You can also watch NOVA on demand at PBS Amazon Prime, Amazon, Vudu, Microsoft Movies & TV, Google Play, iTunes, PBS online.

Tuesday 8:00 PM et/pt on PBS
49 Seasons, 882 Episodes
March 3, 1974
8.7/10
Cast: Neil Ross
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NOVA Full Episode Guide

  • Who says you need brains to be smart? Extremely primitive life-forms called slime molds can navigate mazes, choose between foods, and create efficient networks

  • Our DNA can determine attributes from eye color to medical predispositions. An extraordinary technology called CRISPR allows us to edit human DNA, possibly eliminating genetic diseases or choosing our children's features. But how far should we go?

  • Eagles dominate the skies. But what makes these predators so special? Researchers study one special bird

  • Do we control our fat, or does it control us? For generations, overweight individuals have been stigmatized and cast as lazy. But scientists are coming to understand fat as a fascinating and dynamic organ

  • From fruit flies to whales, virtually every animal sleeps. But why? Why do we need to spend nearly a third of our lives in such a defenseless state? Scientists are peering more deeply into the sleeping brain than ever before, discovering just how powerful sleep can be, playing a role in everything from memory retention and emotional regulation to removing waste from our brains. So why are we getting so little of it?

  • Worshipped as a goddess, condemned as satanic, and spun into a stunning array of breeds, cats have long fascinated humans. But did we ever really domesticate them? And what can science tell us about our most mysterious companions?

  • Dogs have long been dependable companions by our sides. But it wasn't always that way, and a look at their closest living relative, the wolf, makes it clear why. Research into dog domestication and intelligence offers clues into what the human-dog relationship is all about. And analyzing dogs' brain activity and genes may even help answer the question of whether dogs are in it for the food

  • In this two-hour special, renowned paleontologist Kirk Johnson takes us on an epic adventure through time at the polar extremes of our planet. Following a trail of strange fossils found in all the wrong places

  • Camera traps and drones are revolutionizing the study of wildlife by providing an up-close look at animals without disturbing them. See how these technologies are helping us understand everything from mysterious whale behavior to tiger migration.

  • Violence is all over the news. But some say we're living in the most peaceful time in history. Journey through time and the human mind to investigate whether-and how-violence has declined. And witness how people are working to stop violence today.

  • Journey to Florence to discover how Leonardo da Vinci used science, from human dissections to innovative painting techniques, to create his legendary artwork. Learn why Mona Lisa's smile is so captivating - and what it took to create it.

  • Since the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in 1947, these fragile parchment relics have intrigued scholars, religious leaders, and profiteers alike. The 2,000-year-old scrolls include the oldest-known versions of the Hebrew Bible and hold vital clues about the birth of Christianity. While certain scrolls have survived intact, others have been ravaged by time

  • Sixty-six million years ago, an asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs in a fiery global catastrophe. But we know little about how their successors, the mammals, recovered and took over the world. Now, hidden inside ordinary-looking rocks, an astonishing trove of fossils reveals a dramatic new picture of how rat-sized creatures ballooned in size and began to evolve into the vast array of species

  • Tech giants and car manufacturers alike are developing self-driving cars - and some of them are already on public roads. But what must computers be capable of to truly take the wheel? And could they eventually be safer than human drivers?

  • In 2018, Italy's Morandi Bridge collapsed, killing 43 people. NOVA investigates what went wrong and explores other bridge collapses across the United States. How can new engineering techniques make bridges safer and prevent such tragedies?

  • In the far reaches of the solar system, Uranus and Neptune dazzle with unexpected rings, supersonic winds and dozens of moons. And NASA's New Horizons gets a stunning up-close view of Pluto before venturing deep into the Kuiper Belt.

  • NASA's Cassini explores Saturn for 13 years, looping through its icy rings and flying by its moons. The probe captures stunning ring-moon interactions, but when it finds the ingredients for life on the moon Enceladus, a bittersweet decision is made.

  • Jupiter's massive gravitational force made it a wrecking ball when it barreled through the early solar system. But it also shaped life on Earth, delivering comets laden with water - and perhaps even the fateful asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs.

  • Mars was once a blue water world studded with active volcanoes. But when its magnetic field and protective atmosphere faded, it became the frozen desert planet we know today. With so many necessary elements in place, did life ever form on Mars?

  • The rocky planets - Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars - were born of similar material around the same time, yet only one supports life. Were Earth's neighbors always so extreme? Is there somewhere else in the solar system where life might flourish?

  • Fifty years after humans first set foot on the moon, new scientific discoveries are fueling excitement for a return to the lunar surface -- this time, perhaps, to stay. Join the scientists and engineers working to make life on the moon a reality.

  • Forty years ago, hundreds of skeletons were unearthed in a mass grave in an English village. Bioarchaeologist Cat Jarman believes these bones are the last remains of the "Great Heathen Army," a legendary Viking fighting force that invaded England in the ninth century and has long been lost to history. Armed with the latest scientific methods, Cat's team uncovers extraordinary human stories from the front line, including evidence of women fighters and a lost warrior reunited with his son in death.

  • Horse riding played a key role in human expansion and civilization. But when and how did people first master these animals? Scientists use archaeology and genetics to uncover clues about the first horse riders and how they shaped the world.

  • From the front line of the Camp Fire, the deadliest wildfire in California history, NOVA tells the stories of residents who had to flee for their lives during the 2018 fire season. Scientists racing to understand what's behind the rise of record-breaking megafires across the American West take to the forest, and even a fire lab, in search of answers. They investigate how forestry practices, climate change, and the physics of fire itself play a role in the dramatic increase in wildfires in recent decades.

  • Discover Campi Flegrei, a lesser-known volcano in the shadow of Vesuvius. If it erupts, millions of lives could be at risk. Meet the scientists exploring its geography and developing a warning system to prevent Naples from becoming the next Pompeii.

  • Marvel at a new era of space exploration and accessibility, thanks to NASA's return to crewed spaceflight, as well as private companies like SpaceX and Virgin Galactic, and technologies that make rockets cheaper and more powerful than ever.

  • How did the ancient Egyptians build the pyramids of Giza with only copper hand tools and none of today's construction and surveying equipment; and who were the thousands of laborers who raised the stones.

  • Hawaiʻi’s Kīlauea volcano erupted in 2018, sending rivers of lava through communities and into the sea. Join scientists and local residents as they investigate the frightening spike in volcanic activity that turned an island paradise into an inferno.

  • Einstein called it “spooky action at a distance,” but today quantum entanglement is poised to revolutionize technology from computers to cryptography. Physicists have gradually become convinced that the phenomenon

  • Since it explored Pluto in 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft has been zooming toward NASA’s most distant target yet. Join the mission team as the probe attempts to fly by Ultima Thule, an object 4 billion miles from Earth.

NOVA News

NOVA Video Clips & Extras

Secret Mind Of Slime Clip (00:30) Mysteries Of Sleep Clip (00:31) How Climate Has Shifted Over Millions of Years I NOVA I PBS Clip (02:45) This Cave Has Been Frozen Since the Last Ice Age I NOVA I PBS Clip (06:41) Fifty Million Years Ago, the Arctic Was a Warm Swamp I NOVA I PBS Clip (02:08) Meet "Titanosaur," the Largest Dinosaur Ever 360 I NOVA I PBS Clip (02:07) Why Trees Are Living Climate Records I NOVA I PBS Clip (01:29)