New York Mets

Watch New York Mets

  • 1969
  • 1 Season

When the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants left for the West Coast in 1957, New York City was left with only one professional league baseball team. The New York Mets stepped in and have been playing in Flushing, Queens since 1962. Watch the Mets in the blue and orange uniforms take on their opponent as they fight for dominance in the National League. Catch a rivalry game against Atlanta or Philly, and don't miss the yearly subway series against the New York Yankees. Gary Cohen calls the play by play and is assisted by color commentators Keith Hernandez and Ron Darling. Get ready to play ball with Mr. Met the team's mascot or his wife, Mrs. Met.

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Seasons
1999 NLCS, Game 5: Braves at Mets
6. 1999 NLCS, Game 5: Braves at Mets
October 17, 1999
Atlanta Braves 3 at NY Mets 4, F/15 -- Robin Ventura's grand-slam single ends this marathon game. At five hours and 46 minutes, it is one of the longest game in postseason history -- but this Shea Stadium classic is well worth the wait. Facing elimination, the Mets hang on against the rival Braves until the 15th inning, when the bases fill up for Robin Ventura. Ventura, hitless thus far in the series, belts a grand slam into the right-field seats ... or does he? Because he is mobbed before he even reaches second base, Ventura's game-winner is scored a single.
1986 World Series, Game 7: Red Sox at Mets
5. 1986 World Series, Game 7: Red Sox at Mets
October 27, 1986
October 27, 1986: 1986 World Series, Game 7: Boston Red Sox 5 at New York Mets 8, F -- Both teams were facing their final game in one of the most dramatic postseasons ever: the Mets finally triumphant in an epic NLCS vs. the Houston Astros; the Red Sox fighting the "Curse of the Bambino" and the California Angels in the ALCS... and of course both clubs coming directly off the heels of the infamous "Bill Buckner" Game 6. And so the 1986 season for all the marbles came down to this final game at a packed and raucous Shea Stadium. A rainout of the originally-scheduled Game 7 the day before allowed the pressure to build for another 24 hours. Boston jumped out to a 3-0 lead; the Mets tied it four innings later, and built the lead in the 7th and 8th innings, including a home run by Darryl Strawberry and an RBI by closer Jesse Orosco. Indeed, it was Orosco's 1-2-3 ninth inning, and his subsequent flinging of arms and glove into the air that became the iconic image for these '86 Mets and their Championship season, and another defeat for the long-suffering Red Sox and their fans. Of course, it could not be known at the time, but this was the last World Series game the Sox would lose in 20 years; they swept to Championships in 2004 and 2007. At the time, however, it was a heart-stopping end to one of the classic postseasons in baseball history.
1986 World Series, Game 6: Red Sox at Mets
4. 1986 World Series, Game 6: Red Sox at Mets
October 25, 1986
Boston Red Sox 5 at New York Mets 6, F/10 -- The Mets' 10th-inning comeback is punctuated by the ground ball that squibbed through Bill Buckner's legs and into baseball history. Leading 5-4 in the 10th inning, just one out away from their first Championship since 1918, the Red Sox (much to the frenzied delight of the Shea Stadium crowd) watch it all roll slowly away from them... literally. Bob Stanley's wild pitch allows Kevin Mitchell to score the tying run. Then, on the final pitch of a fabulous at-bat, Mookie Wilson fights off a fastball and dribbles a grounder up the first-base line that slips between Bill Buckner's legs and into history. Ray Knight dashes home with the game-winning run, forcing a Game 7 and permanently adding Buckner's name to the list of notorious baseball "goats."
1986 NLCS, Game 6: Mets at Astros
3. 1986 NLCS, Game 6: Mets at Astros
October 15, 1986
New York Mets 7 at Houston Astros 6, F -- In one of the most thrilling LCS games ever, the Mets finally win this see-saw nail-biter to advance to the World Series. Starter Bob Knepper shut out New York for eight innings before the Mets broke through to tie in the ninth. They finally scored again in the top of the 14th, then watched as the Astros re-tied the game on a Billy Hatcher homer. In the 16th, the Mets pushed across three more runs, but again the Astros fought back. They scored more two runs to draw within one run before Jesse Orosco struck out Kevin Bass to send the exultant and exhausted Mets to the World Series.
1986 NLCS, Game 3: Astros at Mets
2. 1986 NLCS, Game 3: Astros at Mets
October 11, 1986
Houston Astros 5 at New York Mets 6, F -- Mets shift the series momentum on Lenny "Nails" Dykstra's two-run, 9th inning walk-off. With Astros' closer Dave Smith on the mound, Wally Backman bunted his way on, benefiting from a controversial runner-out-of-the-baseline call. One batter later, up stepped fan favorite, firebrand Lenny "Nails" Dykstra, who struck out in his first at-bat as a pinch-hitter in the 7th. Not known as a power hitter, Nails got ahold of one and enjoyed the two-run walk-off, as the Mets took the game 6-5, and lead in the series, 2-1.
1969 World Series, Game 5: Orioles at Mets
1. 1969 World Series, Game 5: Orioles at Mets
October 16, 1969
Baltimore Orioles 3 at New York Mets 5, F -- The Miracle Mets complete the upset over the heavily-favored Baltimore Orioles. Slugger Donn Clendenon and light-hitting Al Weis each homered to back the five-hit pitching of Jerry Koosman as the Mets closed out their first-ever World Series championship. A key play in the sixth featured Cleon Jones being plunked on the foot by Baltimore starter Dave McNally. Jones was not originally awarded the base, but manager Gil Hodges retrieved the ball and pointed out the telltale black shoe polish on the ball as proof. Rattled, McNally surrendered a two-run homer to the next batter, Clendenon, bringing the Mets within a run and shifting the momentum irrevocably toward New York. The Mets tacked on three more runs in the next two innings and the Amazing' upset was complete.
Description

When the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants left for the West Coast in 1957, New York City was left with only one professional league baseball team. The New York Mets stepped in and have been playing in Flushing, Queens since 1962. Watch the Mets in the blue and orange uniforms take on their opponent as they fight for dominance in the National League.

Catch a rivalry game against Atlanta or Philly, and don't miss the yearly subway series against the New York Yankees. Gary Cohen calls the play by play and is assisted by color commentators Keith Hernandez and Ron Darling. Get ready to play ball with Mr. Met the team's mascot or his wife, Mrs. Met.

  • Premiere Date
    October 16, 1969