Watch This Giant Beast That is the Global Economy (4K UHD)

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This Giant Beast That is the Global Economy (4K UHD) is a series that is currently running and has 1 seasons (18 episodes). The series first aired on February 22, 2019. It has mostly positive reviews from critics and viewers, who have given it an IMDb score of 8.5.

This Giant Beast That is the Global Economy (4K UHD) is available for streaming on the Amazon Studios website, both individual episodes and full seasons. You can also watch This Giant Beast That is the Global Economy (4K UHD) on demand at Amazon Prime online.

Amazon Studios
1 Season, 18 Episodes
February 22, 2019
8.5/10
Cast: Kal Penn, Cristela Alonzo
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This Giant Beast That is the Global Economy (4K UHD) Full Episode Guide

  • Why is that people in power so often use that power for personal gain? Host Kal Penn explores the wide range of corruption -- from petty bribery to grand corruption -- and how it can cripple entire economies. Traveling from San Francisco to Prague, Kuala Lumpur, Mumbai, and Singapore, Kal witnesses the various ways governments and individuals are fighting to keep their countries corruption-free. Kal begins his journey at UC Berkeley, where former US Secretary of Labor, Robert Reich, gives him a crash course in corruption. From there, he travels to India, where petty bribery is part of everyday life. Back in New York, Kal talks to New Yorker journalist Adam Davidson about how you know when corruption goes beyond a few bad apples and has infected the larger system. Interested in getting a front-row seat to corruption in the wild, Kal takes a

  • Why is that people in power so often use that power for personal gain? Host Kal Penn explores the wide range of corruption -- from petty bribery to grand corruption -- and how it can cripple entire economies. Traveling from San Francisco to Prague, Kuala Lumpur, Mumbai, and Singapore, Kal witnesses the various ways governments and individuals are fighting to keep their countries corruption-free. Kal begins his journey at UC Berkeley, where former US Secretary of Labor, Robert Reich, gives him a crash course in corruption. From there, he travels to India, where petty bribery is part of everyday life. Back in New York, Kal talks to New Yorker journalist Adam Davidson about how you know when corruption goes beyond a few bad apples and has infected the larger system. Interested in getting a front-row seat to corruption in the wild, Kal takes a

  • What does it cost you to die? Host Kal Penn travels to Spain, the Czech Republic, Germany, Malaysia, LA and New York, meeting with workers and experts in the

  • What does it cost you to die? Host Kal Penn travels to Spain, the Czech Republic, Germany, Malaysia, LA and New York, meeting with workers and experts in the

  • What does it cost you to die? Host Kal Penn travels to Spain, the Czech Republic, Germany, Malaysia, LA and New York, meeting with workers and experts in the

  • Fakes siphon off billions of dollars a year from the global economy. It's their uncanny ability to effectively imitate the real thing that gives them their power. They can undermine multimillion dollar brands

  • Fakes siphon off billions of dollars a year from the global economy. It's their uncanny ability to effectively imitate the real thing that gives them their power. They can undermine multimillion dollar brands

  • There are a lot of ways to imagine how the world will end - but there is a real apocalyptic threat that would grind our global economy to a halt. And almost nobody is talking about it. Natural rubber is a 26 billion dollar industry. It is the backbone of the economy - crammed into everything from our clothing to medical necessities. Without it, planes can't land and trucks can't drive. Host Kal Penn traces the path of this vital commodity from trees to tires and learns about the very real threats to rubber, which could eliminate it from the planet entirely. Kal starts off in Philadelphia, where 12,000-pound monster trucks flip, fly and crash, all on giant rubber monster tires. He then travels from a disease lab in England to a desolate airplane graveyard in the Mojave Desert as he learns from experts about the formidable threats to rubber, and how immediate those threats are. From there, Kal heads to Thailand to follow the path of rubber, beginning with tapping latex at a rubber tree plantation all the way to Singapore, where he learns how it's traded, and how futures contract traders use rubber as a tool for personal enrichment. This episode features appearances by Meghan Trainor, Tone Bell, and Bobby Moynihan.

  • There are a lot of ways to imagine how the world will end - but there is a real apocalyptic threat that would grind our global economy to a halt. And almost nobody is talking about it. Natural rubber is a 26 billion dollar industry. It is the backbone of the economy - crammed into everything from our clothing to medical necessities. Without it, planes can't land and trucks can't drive. Host Kal Penn traces the path of this vital commodity from trees to tires and learns about the very real threats to rubber, which could eliminate it from the planet entirely. Kal starts off in Philadelphia, where 12,000-pound monster trucks flip, fly and crash, all on giant rubber monster tires. He then travels from a disease lab in England to a desolate airplane graveyard in the Mojave Desert as he learns from experts about the formidable threats to rubber, and how immediate those threats are. From there, Kal heads to Thailand to follow the path of rubber, beginning with tapping latex at a rubber tree plantation all the way to Singapore, where he learns how it's traded, and how futures contract traders use rubber as a tool for personal enrichment. This episode features appearances by Meghan Trainor, Tone Bell, and Bobby Moynihan.

  • Let's just say it: a lot of rich people come across as dicks. But is there a reason for this pernicious stereotype? What is it about having a lot of money and a willingness to step over anyone to get more of it that seem to go together? Is there a correlation between

  • Let's just say it: a lot of rich people come across as dicks. But is there a reason for this pernicious stereotype? What is it about having a lot of money and a willingness to step over anyone to get more of it that seem to go together? Is there a correlation between