Blue Planet - Seas of Life - Seasonal Seas

Ep 5. Seasonal Seas

  • TV-G
  • October 10, 2001
  • 48 min
  • 8.0  (551)

Just when the weather is at its worst, 100,000 gray seals haul themselves up through the surf on to Sable Island off Nova Scotia. This is the world's largest colony of gray seals and perversely they've come to breed in winter. Within 18 days the pups are abandoned, but spring is on its way with plenty of food. An eight-ton basking shark filters 1,000 tons of seawater through its gills every hour to sieve out plankton, and large numbers are attracted to plankton blooms. On the seafloor, seaweed stretches towards the sunlight, and off the coast of California, underwater forests of giant kelp grow up to 100 meters high. Massive schools of fish shelter here and sea otters snooze at the surface winding strands of kelp around themselves as anchors. By July, the seasonal seas are warming up fast. On the coast of Nova Scotia large female lobsters are marching 150km from cold, deep waters where they spent the winter, to warm shallows where they can incubate their eggs. In August, pacific salmon return to the coast of Alaska and are hunted down by huge salmon sharks. By early autumn, Pacific white-sided dolphins are turning up in British Columbia in great numbers. Rather than fish for herring they like to play - engaging in a dolphin's version of tag, as they pass a strand of seaweed from flipper to flipper. As fast as winter approaches in the north, spring is coming back at the opposite end of the world. Handfish walk across the bottom of the sea, using their fins like hands. There is also a beautiful courtship ballet performed by Australian squid that change color as they dance. A male leafy seadragon is a devoted parent, carrying dozens of eggs on his belly and relying on his perfect leafy camouflage to hide them from other hungry fish.

Description

Just when the weather is at its worst, 100,000 gray seals haul themselves up through the surf on to Sable Island off Nova Scotia. This is the world's largest colony of gray seals and perversely they've come to breed in winter. Within 18 days the pups are abandoned, but spring is on its way with plenty of food. An eight-ton basking shark filters 1,000 tons of seawater through its gills every hour to sieve out plankton, and large numbers are attracted to plankton blooms. On the seafloor, seaweed stretches towards the sunlight, and off the coast of California, underwater forests of giant kelp grow up to 100 meters high. Massive schools of fish shelter here and sea otters snooze at the surface winding strands of kelp around themselves as anchors. By July, the seasonal seas are warming up fast. On the coast of Nova Scotia large female lobsters are marching 150km from cold, deep waters where they spent the winter, to warm shallows where they can incubate their eggs. In August, pacific salmon return to the coast of Alaska and are hunted down by huge salmon sharks. By early autumn, Pacific white-sided dolphins are turning up in British Columbia in great numbers. Rather than fish for herring they like to play - engaging in a dolphin's version of tag, as they pass a strand of seaweed from flipper to flipper. As fast as winter approaches in the north, spring is coming back at the opposite end of the world. Handfish walk across the bottom of the sea, using their fins like hands. There is also a beautiful courtship ballet performed by Australian squid that change color as they dance. A male leafy seadragon is a devoted parent, carrying dozens of eggs on his belly and relying on his perfect leafy camouflage to hide them from other hungry fish.

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Blue Planet - Seas of Life, Season 1 Episode 5, is available to watch and stream on BBC Earth. You can also buy, rent Blue Planet - Seas of Life on demand at Amazon online.

  • First Aired
    October 10, 2001
  • Content Rating
    TV-G
  • Runtime
    48 min
  • Language
    English
  • IMDB Rating
    8.0  (551)