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You do not need to be in school to be educated. Try expanding your horizons outside the classroom environment with Fora.tv science. Leave the textbooks, pencils, and study guides behind- this program series allows learning to be a simple task instead of a rigorous one. Fora.tv science will inform you about everything happening in the realm of science.

A web-based television program, Fora.tv is a site that features an extensive compendium of video footage from live forums, affairs and lectures. These events are usually held at institutions and conferences both domestically and internationally. Fora.tv can access a large amount of information from a diversified pool of topics. Some of those subject matters or issues are politics, public concerns, famous historical occurrences and cultural events. In additional, Fora.tv also has channels primarily aimed at vital themes concerning the United States or other nations across the globe. One can become educated about technological changes or enhancements, science discoveries and business disputes, occurring at the moment.

Debuted in February 2009, Fora.tv has been known to connect researchers, professionals and students on many universal tops about science. Fora.tv science concentrates all aspects dealing with all branches or science from biology and chemistry to engineering and technology. Viewers will get an insight about groundbreaking innovations and inventions happening in the field. You can subscribe to the science channel and get all the latest news and facts about new developments. Stimulate your mind with this webisodes from Fora.tv. It is a form of education system without all the exams and assignments. Forget reality television, tune into Fora.tv and get schooled and expand your imagination!

Daily 11:55 PM et/pt on FORA.tv
2 Seasons, 45 Episodes
February 9, 2007
Talk & Interview
FORA.tv Science
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FORA.tv Science Full Episode Guide

  • Using exceptionally large scale superconductors, Boaz Almog and Barak Deutscher from Tel-Aviv University demonstrated a phenomenon called "Quantum Levitation" or "Quantum Locking" in a way never seen before.

  • Intelligence Squared US debates whether science refutes the existence of God. For the motion: Lawrence Krauss and Michael Shermer. Against the motion: Ian Hutchinson and Dinesh D'Souza.

  • Intelligence Squared US debates whether science refutes the existence of God. For the motion: Lawrence Krauss and Michael Shermer. Against the motion: Ian Hutchinson and Dinesh D'Souza.

  • The UP Experience--Unique Perspectives from Unique People--is pleased to welcome back Dr. David Eagleman, neuroscientist, best-selling author, and UP Master of Ceremonies for the fourth year in a row.

  • Aerospace entrepreneur, Virgin Galactic spacecraft designer, and founder of aerospace research firm Scaled Composites, Burt Rutan is a bold visionary with a passion for the advancement of technology.

  • Vernor Steffen Vinge shares who's afraid of the first movers in Singularity.

  • Biologist and entrepreneur Craig Venter discusses the intersection between health, genomics, research and power.

  • Tim Ferriss, author The 4-Hour Workweek and The 4-Hour Body, discusses how he tracks his life's data in the 4-hour everything.

  • You could almost say that Shannon Bennett's career as a virologist found her after she became infected with parasites while on a volunteer stint in Liberia. Listen as she talks about her research into the evolution and adaptation of viruses.

  • NASA scientist Jennifer Heldmann teaches us all about earth's trusty sidekick, the moon. She discusses theories on its formation, predictions about its future, its geological past and present, and the many ways in which it affects the earth.

  • NASA scientist Jennifer Heldmann teaches us all about earth's trusty sidekick, the moon. She discusses theories on its formation, predictions about its future, its geological past and present, and the many ways in which it affects the earth.

  • The incredible feats that athletes accomplish fascinate us, but what is the impact of doping on sports? A panel of experts explore the science of doping, advances in detection, and what the doping debate says about sports, society, and human nature.

  • Experts in psychology, philosophy, and neuroscience discuss the interrelationship between evolution, humanity, and the brain.

  • Experts in psychology, philosophy, and neuroscience discuss the interrelationship between evolution, humanity, and the brain.

  • As we use the tools of science to explore the nature of humanity, we are learning more and more about how our brains function and what motivates our behavior, built-in biases and blind spots.

  • As we use the tools of science to explore the nature of humanity, we are learning more and more about how our brains function and what motivates our behavior, built-in biases and blind spots.

  • "Dark matter" is what physics calls the invisible, theoretical stuff that makes up the majority of the universe. In a way, says biologist Jonathan Eisen, biology also has its own "Dark Matter" -- the tiny yet vast world of microbes.

  • Neuroscience has given us fleeting insights into our own intuition, habits and seemingly unexplainable preferences, often with profound implications. Will we ever solve the mysteries of the brain? Two leading neuroscientists examine the issue.

  • Space is often thought of as a frontier for exploration and colonization, but it also holds enormous potential for economic investment. In this program, a panel of aerospace experts join NPR's Ira Flatow to discuss the business of space.

  • Donald Johanson changed our understanding of the past with his 1974 discovery of a 3.2 million year-old skeleton now known as "Lucy." In this talk, Dr. Johnanson explains how paleoanthropology has established Africa as the crucible for human evolution.

  • "Scientists are discovering viruses faster than they can make sense of them," says science writer Carl Zimmer of the most rapidly-evolving organism on the planet. Zimmer explores how little we really know about these mighty, miniscule lifeforms.

  • Lera Boroditsky is Stanford's psychologist in this episode examines the question of languages and how they shape the way we think.

  • Dr. Robert Sapolosky is the professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University explains just how little separates homo sapiens from our closest relatives in the animal kingdom.

  • In this captivating lecture, Lord Martin Rees, President of the Royal Society and England's Astronomer Royal, brings a lifetime of cosmological inquiry to a crucial question: What if human success on Earth determines life's success in the universe?

  • While we may aspire to live a century, Rachel Sussman documents creatures who don't bat an eye at a millennium or two. In this presentation, Sussman exhibits her work photographing creatures with stories longer than all of recorded human history.

  • From pills in your medicine chest to a viper in the wilderness, join California Poison Control System MD Patil Armenian for this lecture on all the various toxic substances you can ingest, inject, drink, get stung by, or be bitten with.

  • What happens when you've been in space for a year? Is it possible to survive a bailout at 17,000 miles per hour? From the space shuttle training toilet to NASA's crash simulation tests, Mary Roach examines the curious science of space exploration.

  • How are science and skepticism related? Is skepticism a part of science, or is science a tool of skepticism? Science educator Dr. Eugenie Scott discusses these questions, and explores the importance of teaching both science and critical thinking.

  • How will global warming affect animal development? Stanford biology professor Elizabeth Hadly explains her globe-spanning work on understanding animal diversity through space and time, and how that diversity is influenced by environmental changes.

  • From Mendel to Darwin, DNA to bio-medicine and beyond, join professor Paul Nurse as he recounts a few of biology's greatest achievements and illuminates the pioneering minds behind them.

  • On May 31, 2009, exploratory ship Ocean Watch departed from Seattle, Washington on a daring scientific expedition around the North and South American continents. Now closing in on the final leg of the trip, the team recounts their adventures so far.

  • For years, NASA's David Morrison has been an active critic of fears that the world will end in 2012... and of imaginative con artists who use mass media to frighten people for profit. In this entertaining lecture, he lays out the case against apocalypse.

  • Neurobiologist Louann Brizendine follows up her bestselling The Female Brain with a discussion on her latest book, The Male Brain: A Breakthrough Understanding of How Men and Boys Think.

  • Biologist Jack Dumbacher, Curator of Birds and Mammals at the California Academy of Sciences, recounts stories of his field expeditions to Papua New Guinea, including his discovery of a poison-secreting bird -- the first to be documented by science.

  • Climatologist Stephen Schneider tries to clarify the science behind the spin on global warming. Schneider explains why many scientists are frustrated with the way their research is presented in the media, and gives his take on how to move things forward.

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  • Authors Terry Johnson and Kyle Kurpinsky bring a humorous dose of reality to the odd -- and often fictionalized -- world of biotechnology in their book, How to Defeat Your Own Clone: And Other Tips for Surviving the Biotech Revolution.

  • Botanist Darin Penneys has braved dangerous beasts and explored exotic locales in his quest for unusual pant specimens from the Americas and China. In this talk, Penneys shares stories of his travels, and discusses his research on the Princess Flower.

  • Why do fools fall in love? Helen Fisher has a few ideas. A biological anthropologist, Rutgers University research professor and advisor to Chemistry.com, Fisher explains her neurology-based theory of mutual attraction.

  • What's new in the search for alien life? SETI Director and 2009 Ted Prize winner Jill Tarter describes her vision of a globalized search for extra-terrestrial intelligence.

  • Are we the first civilization to live through climate change? How have past societies engineered sustainable solutions to a shifting world? Archeologist Sander van der Leeuw explains how long-lost history can provide new insight on current global issues.

  • Neil deGrasse Tyson, the bestselling author and director of the world-famous Hayden Planetarium, chronicles America's irrational love affair with Pluto, man's best celestial friend.

  • Neil deGrasse Tyson talks about Death By Black Hole And Other Cosmic Quandaries

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