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POV is a television program produced and aired on PBS stations across the United States. The show airs independent nonfiction documentaries that would not normally be seen by the majority of viewers. POV are the initials standing for "point of view" since the documentaries aired are typically from the viewpoint of a person or group organization. It is the longest running television show airing independent films with 14-16 being shown each year.

A great number of directors have been featured on POV including Michael Moore, best known for his inflammatory documentary Fahrenheit 9/11, also Errol Morris, Michael Apted, and Ross McElwee. The films presented by these directors and others typically showcase a social issue or follow the life of a person or persons as they conduct themselves in everyday activities.

POV has been on air since July 5, 1988 and has currently aired over 300 different independent documentary films. There has been a total of 24 seasons with the show entering it's 25th season fairly soon in 2013. It is a well known show and has garnered critical acclaim and fame for its work in displaying independent film. The films shown on POV have gone on to win three Oscars, 15 Peabody awards, a Webby award, 32 Emmys, 36 Cine Golden Eagles among a great number of other awards and prizes. Some of the great documentary films shown on the show include The Lost Boys of Sudan, Bright Leaves, Prison Town USA, and Food Inc.

As a television show, POV is considered to be one of the greatest shows for displaying the variety of American documentary films and film making. Airing the greatest documentaries on TV has led to its acclaim. Its long accomplishments has allowed it to continue airing the greatest of these.

Monday 10:00 PM et/pt on PBS
29 Seasons, 389 Episodes - Currently Airing
September 1, 2003
Documentary & Biography
7.8/10
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POV Full Episode Guide

  • Inside the very first girls' school in a tiny Afghan village, education goes far past the classroom as the students learn the differences between the lives they were born into and the lives they dream of having.

  • When Ryan Green, a video game programmer, discovers that his young boy Joel has cancer, he and his wife start to record their emotional path with a poetic video game. Follow Ryan and his family over two years inventing "That Dragon, Cancer," which develops from a cathartic exercise into a critically acclaimed work of art that sets the gaming business abuzz.

  • The danger is eminent as intrepid young filmmaker Nanfu Wang trails maverick activist Ye Haiyan (aka Hooligan Sparrow) and her team of colleagues to southern China as they search for justice in the case of six elementary school girls presumably sexually abused by their principal.

  • When director Sharon Shattuck's father came out as transgender, Sharon was in the awkward throes of middle school. As the Shattucks reunite to plan Sharon's wedding, she seeks a deeper understanding of how her parents' marriage, and their family, survived intact.

  • Emmy®-nominated filmmaker Bernardo Ruiz takes an unflinching look at the hard choices and destructive consequences of the U.S.-Mexico drug war. Witness the human side of the conflict through the eyes of a U.S. drug enforcement agent, an activist nun in Mexico and a former Texas smuggler.

  • Follow two African-American teenagers on their path to reach a dream of graduating from college.

  • Come behind the scenes of Yoshida Brewery to observe how artisans create saké, Japan's loved and respected rice wine.

  • Meet Iris Apfel, a 93-year-old style expert with an enormous presence on the New York fashion scene.

  • Contemplate how the destructive cycle of sexual abuse - and the silence surrounding it - can be discontinued.

  • An optometrist identifies the men who killed his brother in the horrific 1965 Indonesian genocide. He confronts them while testing their eyesight and demands they accept responsibility.

  • At a PTSD treatment center in California, follow veterans and their loved ones on their journeys to recovery.

  • In 2012, California amended its "Three Strikes" law, suddenly freeing jailers and spinning lives upside down.

  • Examining the persecution of Chinese artist Ai Weiwei and how the government tried to silence him.

  • The story of married artists Ushio and Noriko Shinohara, who met in the early 1970s when he was 41 and she was 19. In the following years, she put her ambitions on hold to act as his assistant and care for their son; and, though he's earned accolades for his work, financial success has eluded him. Noriko, for her part, is finally fulfilling her own (delayed) dreams via "Cutie and Bullie," a series of drawings that recount their life together.

  • Examining human trafficking in Cambodia through the eyes of a former slave.

  • Ride shotgun with Matt VanDyke, who films his self-transformation from a timid 26-year-old to a motorcycle-driving rebel, fighting in the Libyan revolution. Two-time Oscar nominee Marshall Curry tells his amazing story.

  • Learn about the young migrants in a Swiss integration class who have sacrificed it all for a new life.

  • A look at life along the Sudan-South Sudan border, where people harvest crops, raise cattle, and try to avoid air raids.

  • A routine of tea and pastries holds time to commemorate life's joys and cope with infidelity, illness and death.

  • This episode takes an inside look at the terrible war Assad's regime has waged.

  • A look into the treatment of three Chinese teenagers who are obsessed gamers.

  • When two parents lose custody of their children, they fight to reunite their family by winning back the trust of the court.

  • This episode covers issues regarding the North Dakota oil boom, with details about the happenings at the Williston church whose pastor turned it into a makeshift dorm for folks unable to find housing.

  • The twenty-eighth season kicks off with "Out in the Night," an account of four African-American lesbian friends who got into a fight with a man who had verbally and physically attacked them in 2006 NYC. He was stabbed; and they were eventually convicted of gang assault.

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