Watch Geometry: An Interactive Journey to Mastery

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Like other math fields, geometry teaches us how to think. It leads students to uncover new truths based on already established ideas and facts. In short, geometry is among the great intellectual feats of humankind. Build an understanding of geometry from the ground up with these 36 lectures.

Geometry: An Interactive Journey to Mastery is a Documentary & Biography series that is currently running and has 1 seasons (36 episodes). The series first aired on August 29, 2014.

Geometry: An Interactive Journey to Mastery is available for streaming on the The Great Courses website, both individual episodes and full seasons. You can also watch Geometry: An Interactive Journey to Mastery on demand at Amazon Prime, Amazon, The Roku Channel online.

The Great Courses
1 Season, 36 Episodes
August 29, 2014
Documentary & Biography
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Geometry: An Interactive Journey to Mastery Full Episode Guide

  • Wrap up the course by looking at several fun and different ways of reimagining geometry. Explore the counterintuitive behaviors of shapes, angles, and lines in spherical geometry, hyperbolic geometry, finite geometry, and even taxi-cab geometry. See how the world of geometry is never a closed-book experience.

  • In lecture 6, you saw how 17th-century mathematician Rene Descartes united geometry and algebra with the invention of the coordinate plane. Now go a step further and explore the power and surprises that come from using the complex number plane. Examine how using complex numbers can help solve several tricky geometry problems.

  • Wander through the crazy, counterintuitive world of rotations. Use a teacup and string to explore how the mathematics of geometry can describe an interesting result in quantum mechanics.

  • If you have a fixed-length string, what shape can you create with that string to give you the biggest area? Uncover the answer to this question using the legendary story of Dido and the founding of the city of Carthage.

  • Explore the beautiful and mysterious world of fractals. Learn what they are and how to create them. Examine famous examples such as Sierpinski's Triangle and the Koch Snowflake. Then, uncover how fractals appear in nature - from the structure of sea sponges to the walls of our small intestines.

  • Human aesthetics seem to be drawn to symmetry. Explore this idea mathematically through the study of mappings, translations, dilations, and rotations - and see how symmetry is applied in modern-day examples such as cell phones.

  • Use paper-folding to unveil sets of curves: parabolas, ellipses, and hyperbolas. Study their special properties and see how these curves have applications across physics, astronomy, and mechanical engineering.

  • You've seen geometric tiling patterns on your bathroom floor and in the works of great artists. But what would happen if you made repeating patterns in 3-D space? In this lecture, discover the five platonic solids! Also, become an artist and create your own beautiful patterns - even using more than one type of shape.

  • If you're playing squash and hit the ball against the wall, at what angle will it bounce back? If you're playing pool and want to play a trick shot against the side edge, how do you need to hit the ball? Play with these questions and more through an exploration of the reflection principle.

  • Let's say you don't have a marked ruler to measure lengths or a protractor to measure angles. Can you still draw the basic geometric shapes? Explore how the ancient Greeks were able to construct angles and basic geometric shapes using no more than a straight edge for marking lines and a compass for drawing circles.

  • Unite geometry with the world of probability theory. See how connecting these seemingly unrelated fields offers new ways of solving questions of probability - including figuring out the likelihood of having a short wait for the bus at the bus stop.

  • So far, you've figured out all kinds of fun properties with two-dimensional shapes. But what if you go up to three dimensions? In this lecture, you classify common 3-D shapes such as cones and cylinders, and learn some surprising definitions. Finally, you study the properties (like volume) of these shapes.

  • We say that pi is 3.14159 ... but what is pi really? Why does it matter? And what does it have to do with the area of a circle? Explore the answer to these questions and more - including how to define pi for shapes other than circles (such as squares).

  • What do we mean when we say "area"? Explore how its definition isn't quite so straightforward. Then, work out the formula for the area of a triangle and see how to use that formula to derive the area of any other polygon.

  • In your study of lines, you used the combination of geometry and algebra to determine all kinds of interesting properties and characteristics. Now, you'll do the same for circles, including deriving the algebraic equation for a circle.

  • Explore the world of circles! Learn the definition of a circle as well as what mathematicians mean when they say things like radius, chord, diameter, secant, tangent, and arc. See how these interact, and use that knowledge to prove the inscribed angle theorem and Thales' theorem.

  • So far, you've seen how to calculate the sine, cosine, and tangents of basic angles (0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90°). What about calculating them for other angles - without a calculator? You'll use the Pythagorean theorem to come up with formulas for sums and differences of the trig identities, which then allow you to calculate them for other angles.

  • The trig identities you explored in the last lecture go beyond circles. Learn how to define all of them just using triangles (expressed in the famous acronym SOHCAHTOA). Then, uncover how trigonometry is practically applied by architects and engineers to measure the heights of buildings.

  • How can you figure out the "height" of the sun in the sky without being able to measure it directly with a ruler? Follow the path of ancient Indian scholars to answer this question using "angle of elevation" and a branch of geometry called trigonometry. You learn the basic trig identities (sine, cosine, and tangent) and how physicists use them to describe circular motion.

  • Continue the work of classification with triangles. Find out what mathematicians mean when they use words like scalene, isosceles, equilateral, acute, right, and obtuse. Then, learn how to use the Pythagorean theorem to determine the type of triangle (even if you don't know the measurements of the angles).

  • Classify all different types of four-sided polygons (called quadrilaterals) and learn the surprising characteristics about the diagonals and interior angles of rectangles, rhombuses, trapezoids, and more. Also see how real-life objects - like ironing boards - exhibit these geometric characteristics.

  • Continue your study of parallelism by exploring the properties of transversals (lines that intersect two other lines). Prove how corresponding angles are congruent, and see how this fact ties into a particular type of polygon: trapezoids.

  • You've learned how to find the midpoint between two points. But what if you have three points? Or four points? Explore the concept of equidistance and how it reveals even more about the properties of triangles and other shapes.

  • Delve deeper into the connections between algebra and geometry by looking at lines and their equations. Use the three basic assumptions from previous lectures to prove that parallel lines have the same slope and to calculate the shortest distance between a point and a line.

  • Build on the side-angle-side postulate and derive other ways of testing whether triangles are similar or congruent. Also dive into several practical applications, including a trick botanists use for estimating the heights of trees and a way to measure the width of a river using only a baseball cap.

  • Define what it means for polygons to be "similar" or "congruent" by thinking about photocopies. Then use that to prove the third key assumption of geometry - the side-angle-side postulate - which lets you verify when triangles are similar. Thales of Ionia used this principle in 600 B.C.E. to impress the Egyptians by calculating the height of the pyramids.

  • The beauty of geometry is that each result logically builds on the others. Mathematicians demonstrate this chain of deduction using proofs. Learn this step-by-step process of logic and see how to construct your own proofs.

  • Examine how our usual definition of parallelism is impossible to check. Use the fundamental assumptions from the previous lectures to follow in Euclid's footsteps and create an alternative way of checking if lines are parallel. See how, using this result, it's possible to compute the circumference of the Earth just by using shadows!

  • Learn how watching a fly on his ceiling inspired the mathematician Rene Descartes to link geometry and algebra. Find out how this powerful connection allows us to use algebra to calculate distances, midpoints, and more.

  • We commonly define the Pythagorean theorem using the formula a2 + b2 = c2. But Pythagoras himself would have been confused by that. Explore how this famous theorem can be explained using common geometric shapes (no fancy algebra required), and how it's a critical foundation for the rest of geometry.

  • Shapes with straight lines (called polygons) are all around you, from the pattern on your bathroom floor to the structure of everyday objects. But although we may have an intuitive understanding of what these shapes are, how do we define them mathematically? What are their properties? Find out the answers to these questions and more.

  • Lay the basic building blocks of geometry by examining what we mean by the terms point, line, angle, plane, straight, and flat. Then learn the postulates or axioms for how those building blocks interact. Finally, work through your first proof - the vertical angle theorem.