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In this food-focused series, chef Pati Jinich explores the cuisine of Mexico, setting her sights on a different food for each episode. She covers both traditional Mexican dishes and ingredients, as well as the foods that grew out of the intersection of Mexico and the United States.

Pati's Mexican Table is a series that is currently running and has 9 seasons (114 episodes). The series first aired on April 2, 2011.

Pati's Mexican Table is available for streaming on the website, both individual episodes and full seasons. You can also watch Pati's Mexican Table on demand atAmazon Prime, Amazon, PBS, Tubi TV online.

PBS
9 Seasons, 114 Episodes
April 2, 2011
Reality
7.9/10
Cast: Pati Jinich
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Pati's Mexican Table Full Episode Guide

  • Pati is inspired by Sonora's "northern flavors" where the hot, arid desert lends itself to hearty and surprising recipes. She makes traditional tamales with corn, chiles, and cheese, and then for the main course, pork chops topped with a pickled grape salad. In Sonora, she visits a traditional hacienda, where she gets a true taste of Sonoran ranch food.

  • As Pati travels with her TV production crew through Mexico's vast state of Sonora, she's inspired by the bold flavors and ingredients. They stop at a hacienda outside of Hermosillo, where Pati prepares her take on a true Sonoran feast in the rustic outdoor kitchen: Sonora cheese soup, chicken in pecan and ancho chile sauce, and asparagus with chiltep'n.

  • Pati makes three classic Sonoran recipes, each one a meal in itself: a fish special called pescado zarandeado, a rich stew called gallina pinta, and a tasty dirty rice with clams. In Sonora, she visits vacation destination Puerto Penasco, where some of the town's best chefs take her to the local market and invite her for a feast of their favorite recipes from the region.

  • Pati travels to Sonora's coast on the Sea of Cortez, where local legend Tono Contreras gives her a tour including shellfish on the beach, his restaurant Mariscos El Rey, and his home kitchen for some crave-worthy recipes. This inspires Pati to make a couple seafood-loaded recipes at home - double-stacked shrimp and cheese tacos and a Sonoran-style shrimp and scallop tostada.

  • Pati spends a day in the kitchen with her middle son, Sami, cooking recipes inspired by her travels in Sonora that she knows he'll love - beef and potato chimichangas, rice with lentils and caramelized onions, and an avocado and radish salad. In Sonora, Pati sees how the family bond can be the secret to delicious recipes at a famous family run street food stand, Johnny's Tacos in Hermosillo.

  • Sonoran wheat has shaped the cuisine of the entire Mexican north and is a staple of Sonoran cuisine. Pati tours one of Hermosillo's oldest flour mills and gets a lesson on making coyotas, a traditional dessert, at a local bakery. In her kitchen, Pati shares her take on a classic Sonoran recipe: a carne con chile burrito. Then, she shows us how to make coyotas at home.

  • Pati learns that carne asada goes way beyond grilled meat in Sonora. It's an important weekly ritual that brings the whole family together. Back home, Pati throws a carne asada in her backyard for her husband and boys. First, she teaches them the basics of a true Sonoran carne asada. Then, for dessert, a whipped peanut buttercream and grape galette.

  • Pati experiences two important Sonoran culinary traditions. First, on the coast in Bah'a Kino, local fishermen receive "the blessing" from a woman from the Seri tribe before heading out on the water to catch giant sea scallops. Then, in the mountain town of Matape, Nere, one of Sonora's few female butchers, shares with Pati a tradition called "the benefit".

  • Pati spends a day in Sonora's capital, Hermosillo, visiting some of the city's best culinary destinations. From gigantic burritos at Dona Guille, to a meat lover's feast with the owner of the popular restaurant Mochomos, mingling with the young crowd at La Ruina brew park, and a treat no trip would be complete without, Sonoran hot dogs.

  • In Tucson, Pati learns the basics of artisan bread-making from one of America's best bakers, Don Guerra of Barrio Bakery. This experience sets her on a mission to cross into Sonora, Mexico, to see where the Sonoran wheat Don uses for his breads originates. Pati takes what she learned back to her kitchen to create a menu of tasty recipes using wheat flour.

  • Pati travels to Tucson, Arizona, which claims to have the best 23 miles of Mexican food anywhere in the world. She visits restaurants and meets local chefs to get a deeper understanding of what Mexican food in America truly is. What happens to recipes when they cross the border? How do different cultures connect and shape the food we eat? And what is this Sonoran hot dog everyone is raving about?

  • Pati visits home cooks and an iconic restaurant to sample some of Sinaloa's most beloved dishes. She meets a family of bread bakers in Altata to try their rustic pan de mujer. And she goes to one of the most famous restaurants in Mazatlán, Cuchupetas, which is beloved by celebrities, politicians, and locals for delicious seafood and a one of a kind experience.

  • Known as "Mexico's Breadbasket," Sinaloa produces about 40% of the meat and produce consumed in all of Mexico. Pati travels the countryside to get an up-close look at the wealth of resources Sinaloa has to offer. She visits a dairy farm known for its fresh cheese, tours a high-tech produce farm, and gets a fresh-water fishing lesson from a master fisherman.

  • Celestino Gasca didn't exist until about 30 years ago and is becoming a vacation destination due to its magnificent beaches and idyllic surfing conditions. Pati meets restaurant owner Carmen and helps her cook an iconic Sinaloan dish: pescado zarandeado. Then, she travels to the nearby fishing village Las Barras to learn how to harvest percebes, a tiny crustacean considered a delicacy.

  • The El Chepe railway is a historic passenger train offering stunning views of the Sinaloa countryside and the Copper Canyon. Pati rides the first section of the train's journey, from Los Mochis to El Fuerte, and tastes the gourmet offerings from the train's restaurant, Urike. Back home, the early morning train ride inpsires Pati to make a delicious breakfast based on Sinaloan classics.

  • Pati travels into the mountains of Sinaloa to the tiny village of Jinetes. The small population of barely 100 people live on whatever the land gives them. Miles and miles removed from civilization, they've managed to preserve their customs and recipes for generations. Pati is the first visitor to come learn from their culinary traditions and they've prepared a feast fit for the occasion.

  • Pati is in El Fuerte, one of Mexico's "Pueblos Mágicos" or magic towns. Now a quiet colonial town, El Fuerte was the most important commercial and agricultural center in northwest Mexico for over 300 years. After a walking tour and a stop at the Hotel Posada Hidalgo to try their famous cauques, a unique local shellfish, Pati creates a few lobster recipes in her kitchen.

  • Sinaloa's premiere resort town has 13-miles of beautiful coastline and some of the best restaurants in Mexico. But Mazatlán has overcome a complicated history. Pati meets two close friends, chefs Luis Osuna and Zahie Tellez - both witnessed the evolution of Mazatlán firsthand. They each give her a personal tour of the city, and chef Luis takes Pati to his family's restaurant, Panamá.

  • Pati heads to Los Mochis, a coastal city in the northern region of Sinaloa that was founded by Americans in the late 1800s. After learning its unique history and getting an incredibly delicious tour of the street food, Pati returns to her kitchen to create two mouth-watering taco recipes that take her right back to those street stands in Los Mochis.

  • Pati welcomes dear friend and fellow public television chef and host Vivian Howard to her kitchen. In this south of the border meets southern food experience, Pati and Vivian will cook a couple of their classic recipes for each other, looking for connections in cultures and food.

  • Altata is a small coastal town with stretches of beautiful beaches. Pati meets locals and chefs as the town embarks on a journey to reinvent itself from sleepy fishing village to tourist destination. She takes a boat ride to sample fresh oysters right from the water and visits restaurants serving fresh seafood. At home, Pati prepares a seafood feast based on the bountiful waters of the Altata Bay.

  • Pati visits Culiacán, the capital of Sinaloa. Founded in 1531, Culiacán is the center of trade for produce, meat, and fish. Locals pride themselves on the produce cultivated from the land and nearby sea. Celebrated chef and culinary ambassador Miguel Taniyama takes Pati to the best markets, street food stands, and restaurants. In her kitchen, Pati creates recipes inspired by the experience.